Piracy concerns are growing as ships bypass Africa to escape the blocked Suez Canal.

Since Tuesday, one of the world's biggest cargo ships remained trapped in the river. It is Causing a rich traffic jam on both sides of the water. The name of the ship is Ever Given. Some tankers have chosen to seek Africa's southern tip. It adds weeks to their tour and passing through a piracy-prone area. 

Cargo ships taking the long way around Africa to avoid blocked Suez Canal  risk pirate-infested waters - Business Insider India

It is also grounded in the same place on Friday morning. The tugboats and dredgers are trying to remove the submarine. These are blocking the passage of $12 billion of products. 

Meanwhile, the ship's owner from Japan showed optimism. He said that it would be out by weekend night. Shoei Kisen Kaisha President said sorry on Friday for the "great hail and worry."

Cargo ships taking the long way around Africa to avoid blocked Suez Canal  risk pirate-infested waters - Business Insider India

The Suez Canal officials said that dredging was around 87 percent complete. But it stopped the dredging ship from coming too close to the canal. Some critics guess that setting the ship free could take weeks. Some international shipping firms started looking for other routes on Friday. Also, boats that had before reached the Mediterranean are now starting to do a U-turn.

At least seven LPG tankers changed routes. Three of them taking the longer route to Europe via the Cape of Good Hope in southern Africa. If the blockage lasts into the weekend, the other nine tankers may change their path. At least four tankers with a size of 75k tonnes were also heading around the Cape of Good Hope. Shipping prices have doubled this week. 

Some shipping brands had approached it in the last few days. They remain worried about the fear of piracy attacking their ships. And that too when they were forced to move to Africa. 

Insider

It's unclear how the Ever Given got off track. But officers blamed it on high winds and sandstorms. These are common in Egypt now of year. The blockade is costing $400 million per hour in lost goods.

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